#1stlibjob

#1stlibjob

Twitter transcript for the Everything You Ever Wanted to Know about Finding Your First Librarian Job panel presented at ALA on Sunday, June 30, 2013

  1. @Ashleykparker

     7 d ago

    RT @mlhodge: ATTN #1stlibjob folks: RT @alaannual: #ala2013 attendees will get an email with a
    link to the archive [of taped sessions] in a…

    @ALA_JobLIST

    8 d ago

    RT @mlhodge: ATTN #1stlibjob folks: RT @alaannual: #ala2013 attendees will get an email with a
    link to the archive [of taped sessions] in a…

    @mlhodge

    9 d ago

    ATTN #1stlibjob folks:
    RT @alaannual: #ala2013 attendees will get an email with a
    link to the archive [of taped sessions] in a few weeks.

    @ma_inthelibrary

    10 d ago

    #1stlibjob #ala2013
    Couldn’t make it to the panel yesterday, is the recording posted online
    somewhere or forthcoming?

    @JobsinNigeria1

    10 d ago

    “@the_library_bee: If u are looking for jobs in rural areas, experience
    may be less important b/c of fewer applicants. #1stlibjob #ala2013″

    @readheadlib

    10 d ago

    #1stlibjob #ala2013
    Above all – DON’T UNDERESTIMATE YOURSELF!!! Apply for that dream job; your passion
    will shine through eventually

    @readheadlib

    10 d ago

    #1stlibjob #ala2013 In
    the mean time… volunteer (@alanmrt or
    locally), learn a new language, or participate in worthwhile causes

    @readheadlib

    10 d ago

    #1stlibjob #ala2013 In
    the mean time… volunteer (@ALA or locally), learn a
    new language, or participate in worthwhile causes

    @readheadlib

    10 d ago

    #1stlibjob #ala2013
    Even though you don’t have lib experience, use past experiences to describe ur
    skillset & improve on it!

    @INALJMaryland

    10 d ago

    RT @the_library_bee: If you are looking for jobs in rural areas,
    experience may be less important b/c of fewer applicants. #1stlibjob #ala2…

    @anumoorthy

    10 d ago

    RT @the_library_bee: If you are looking for jobs in rural areas,
    experience may be less important b/c of fewer applicants. #1stlibjob #ala2…

    @ALA_JobLIST

    10 d ago

    RT @the_library_bee: If you are looking for jobs in rural areas,
    experience may be less important b/c of fewer applicants. #1stlibjob #ala2…

    @Ashleykparker

    10 d ago

    @sanguinejudi i would recommend applying in your last semester #1stlibjob
    #ala2013

    @Ashleykparker

    10 d ago

    i had a great time
    doing q&a on the #1stlibjob panel. i hope we were able to help! #ala2013

    @BFlexibl3

    10 d ago

    Thanks for great questions.
    #1stlibjob

    @mlhodge

    10 d ago

    Thanks to everyone who
    came out to #1stlibjob ! Great questions! #ala2013

    @brookieb12

    10 d ago

    Resume consists of
    many dots. Cover letter connects the dots. #ala2013 #1stlibjob

    @brookieb12

    10 d ago

    Lots of excellent
    advice on getting 1st lib job. Session was recorded, so anyone who missed it,
    check it out! #ala2013 #1stlibjob

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Use cover letter to
    expand on your résumé highlights. Use cover letter to connect dots and tell
    work experience story. #ala2013 #1stlibjob

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Public: highlight
    library related exp on resume, explain gaps in employment, explain in cover
    letter how nonlibrary exp=relevant #1stlibjob

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    At academic libraries
    it’s okay to have a longer cover letter of 2 pgs and resume even longer.
    #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @sanguinejudi

    10 d ago

    I’m still in grad
    school- how far into the program can you start applying for MLIS-required jobs?
    #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Good ?: is there a
    better time to apply than others? No, jobs kind of come and go, maybe more acad
    at beg of acad yr #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @brookieb12

    10 d ago

    Have an elevator
    statement ready — a quick statement about your education and experience. #ala2013
    #1stlibjob

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Stay relevant, know
    current trends, read library journals. #1stlibjob advice #ala2013

    @elizabethdeb

    10 d ago

    If your university
    offers it (you might be able to get a free trial too), try socioclean to help
    you clean up your fb profile #1stlibjob

    @LOIS_MLIS

    10 d ago

    RT @devrose: Make absolutely sure you’ve done your
    research on the library – mention specifics from the website. #ala2013
    #1stlibjob

    @LOIS_MLIS

    10 d ago

    RT @the_library_bee: Think of your best qualities before you go
    in to your interview. #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Def mention something
    from the website of library you are applying to bc it shows interest and not a
    generic letter #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @devrose

    10 d ago

    Make absolutely sure
    you’ve done your research on the library – mention specifics from the website.
    #ala2013 #1stlibjob

    @the_library_bee

    10 d ago

    Think of your best
    qualities before you go in to your interview. #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    How to stand out: be
    who u are, not who u think employer wants you to be; show enthusiasm for
    specific job; confidence #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Can be harder to go
    from parapro job to full job within the same library system than from one
    system to the next. #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Out of the box ideas
    counting as lib experience: customer service to users, editing, retail,
    teaching computer classes #ala2013 #1stlibjob

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Public librarian:
    looking for technology and academic types #ala2013 #1stlibjob They tend to go
    elsewhere but can be helpful there, too.

    @brookieb12

    10 d ago

    Utilize new members
    round table resume services #ala2013 #1stlibjob

    @brookieb12

    10 d ago

    If you have less
    experience, try rural libraries with fewer applicants #ala2013 #1stlibjob

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Even terminology
    matters : metadata instead of cataloging. #ala2013 #1stlibjob

    @the_library_bee

    10 d ago

    Do not neglect the
    application form in favor of your resume. Many places look at the app form
    before the resume. #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Get involved in local
    events, use the resume review service from the NMRT, volunteer in libraries
    #ala2013 #1stlibjob

    @LOIS_MLIS

    10 d ago

    RT @the_library_bee: Don’t be discouraged from applying just
    because experience is preferred. If it’s entry level, go for it! #1stlibjob #a…

    @the_library_bee

    10 d ago

    If you are looking for
    jobs in rural areas, experience may be less important b/c of fewer applicants.
    #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    Don’t be humble!
    #ala2013 #1stlibjob Don’t worry about years experience required because often
    not set in stone.

    @nabernater

    10 d ago

    “This is not the
    time in your life to be humble.” #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    I have seen five or
    more of us #1stlibjob #ala2013 #dominicanuniversity

    @the_library_bee

    10 d ago

    Don’t be discouraged
    from applying just because experience is preferred. If it’s entry level, go for
    it! #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @muellerspace

    10 d ago

    What does it say about
    Dominican U that so many people are here for how to find your #1stlibjob at
    #ala2013? We need more career services?

    @efontno

    10 d ago

    Cory Doctorow was
    great; now I’m going to learn about how to get my #1stlibjob. #ala2013

    @mlhodge

    10 d ago

    @spuffyduds @ALA_JobLIST The program should be recorded and available
    online at some point (not sure when) #1stlibjob #ala2013

    @mlhodge

    10 d ago

    Reminder: Q&A
    panel Everything You Ever Wanted to Know About Finding Your First Librarian Job
    starts in 40min @ MCP-S403 #1stlibjob #ala2013

     

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July 11, 2013 at 2:22 pm Leave a comment

#ala12

I had a great time at ALA this year. Because of my NMRT and other committee commitments, I unfortunately wasn’t able to attend many programs, but I did enjoy meeting lots of interesting folks and catching up with friends at my meetings and evening social events!

The one educational program I went to, “Riding the Publishing Rollercoaster: Practical Strategies from Research to Writing,” was amazing, and I’m so glad I found the time to make it to the program! It was later in the day on Monday when lots of folks had already gone home, but the room was still packed to a somewhat uncomfortable standing-room-only. It consisted of a panel of experienced authors and editors providing advice for librarians who wish to publish.

I’ve attached my notes from the program to this post. Please check them out!

July 1, 2012 at 11:35 am Leave a comment

Why I Heart ALA

My fiance cannot comprehend ALA. He’s a math professor and goes to lots of math conferences every year, but even the largest of them can’t hold a candle to ALA Annual. To give you some perspective, the biggest math conference of the year can fit in New Orleans at the same time two other academic disciplines (political science and religious studies) are holding their conferences in the city!

And then there’s ALA. We’re so big that there are only a few cities in the country that can hold us–20-28 thousand strong. (You can see past conference attendance figures here.) Local businesses put out welcome signs for us. You might not think it, but even without our conference badges on, we stand out. You put that many librarians together in one place, and there are going to be a lot of parties; my fiance still finds this hard to believe, but librarians are some pretty hard partyers. Even at my relatively smallish state conference, folks stay up until the wee hours of the morning at the one conference-sponsored social. You put this many people together who only get to talk in person once or twice a year and there’s bound to be some late nights. One conference guide I read actually recommends taking hydration tablets for when you’ve been up till 2 but have a meeting at 8am! And guess who’s taking him up on that?

What does all this mean? So many interesting sessions happening concurrently that my planned conference schedule usually has about 4 programs for every time slot. Free books. LOTS of free books. Vendors giving out booze and snacks in the Exhibit Hall (the fact that the Exhibit Hall alone takes 4-5 hours to get through is also a source of amazement).

And, oh yeah, the most important part: the sheer energizing giddiness of spending 4 straight days with people who are just as excited and passionate about the profession as you. Going to ALA is my absolute favorite part of being a librarian:  it affirms all the reasons I became one, inspires me with ideas on how to become a better one, and going has always led to so many opportunities to get involved and connections that have turned into longstanding professional ties. And it’s just so much fun, even for an introvert like me–the book signings, the cooking stage, hearing literary heroes and professional crushes speak (I was in the front row for Neil Gaiman’s talk with Nancy Pearl last year!), all the amazing things other people are doing in their libraries.

I get on the plane to Anaheim tomorrow. I can’t wait!

June 20, 2012 at 7:00 pm Leave a comment

notes from VLA

Too busy to write a narrative, but here are my notes from the sessions I attended at VLA! I’ll add links to the session presentations once they’re posted on the VLA site.

  • Motivation 101 with Nan Carmack (slides here)
    • Motivation 3.0: doing a task for the love for the task
    • In order to motivate your employees, you need to do 3 things: your motivational strategy must develop, involve, and validate your employees
    • How to involve your staff?
    • Think of things that would motivate you to be more excited about your job
    • Think of things your department could implement that would help motivate
    • No one can make you feel unmotivated without your consent
  • Free Tech Tools for Better Library Instruction by Jennifer Whicker, Kathy Shields, and Amy Pace
    • Use bubbl.us or Mindomo for students to write their sentence, pick out keywords, and write synonyms
    • Jing for annotated screenshots (e,g., for use with virtual reference)
    • lino.it for digital corkboard
  • Teens Can Read, But What Comes After the Young Adult Titles (slides here)
    • Display of adult crossover books in YA section

November 1, 2011 at 3:43 pm Leave a comment

teaching and conferences and new jobs, oh my!

So, between preparing 2 posters and 2 presentations for ALA Annual and tying up loose ends at work–I’ve accepted a position as an assistant branch manager for a public library system–I have fallen off the blogging bandwagon.

The semester’s going well for the most part–everything is MUCH easier, having already taught it all last semester–and several of my students from the winter have dropped by to give me hugs and say hi. We just finished playing Jeopardy as a review for the take-home midterm, and I think in the future–if I ever have a small class again–I want to alter the format to Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? instead. Jeopardy works great in larger classes, because most of the fun comes from the class being rowdy and smack-talking the other teams; my teeny Friday night classes are just too well-behaved. The WWtBaM format would be more dynamic with a smaller group, I think. “Ask the Audience” could be turned into “Ask Google”; 50/50 would work the same way; and I could have name their “phone-a-friend” (another classmate) before the game starts. I’ll have to do some research and see if anyone else has used the WWtBaM format.

If you’re going to be in New Orleans for ALA and want to meet up, I’ll be giving presentations/acting as hostess at the following programs/events:

Friday, 3-4pm @ MCC 271-273: Emerging Leaders Poster Session

Friday, 5:30-7pm @ Howlin’ Wolf Den (907 S. Peters St.) for ACRL-IS Soiree (I co-chaired the committee that planned this)

Saturday, 8-10am @ MCC 293-296: ACRL 101 (helping out as part of EL project)

Saturday, 1-2:30 @ MCC Exhibit Hall booth 2556, table 4: Congratulations! You’ve Landed an Interview: Now What Do Hiring Committees Really Want? (results of this survey)

Saturday, 4-5:30 @ MCC 271-273: LLAMA/NMRT New Leaders Discussion Group

Sunday, 12-1:30 @ ALA JobLIST Placement Center (in Exhibit Hall): Inside an Interview: Understanding What Hiring Committees Want (more detailed results of this survey)

See you in NOLA!

June 21, 2011 at 2:11 pm 1 comment

a better way to teach about plagiarism

So I mentioned earlier this week that my lesson plan on plagiarism didn’t go too well–an introduction to plagiarism through an NPR piece, followed by an activity that had the kids each read a different newspaper article on plagiarism/copyright violations in different industries (fashion, publishing, news, etc.) and then summarize it for the class. Well, the NPR segment is interesting (to me!) but ten minutes is too long for my kids to listen to something without any sort of activity or visuals; it’s just a lecture, only not given by me! And as I mentioned Monday, the newspaper articles were too long and it just wasn’t an entertaining enough activity.

Well, in the interim, I had peer-reviewed a really quite engaging interactive tutorial on plagiarism for MERLOT. So after a brief opening discussion on plagiarism and how it relates to copyright (which was covered in the first half of class), I had them walk through the tutorial, which involves selecting one of four students majoring in various fields as your avatar, and going through the research process as it relates to plagiarism–with all of its dead ends and pitfalls–with that student. It included questions throughout the tutorial where the student had to choose which statement needed a citation, which one was plagiarism, etc.

The students seemed much more engaged with this than the NPR segment I played Friday, asking me questions about the answers they’d gotten wrong in order to figure out why they were wrong. Yay! I followed the tutorial up by having students partner up to complete the activity from the end of the Library Instruction book lesson that I hadn’t used on Friday. The activity quotes a two-paragraph section of an article, and then has three “student” samples that use this article, and asks whether each–or any–of the student samples show plagiarism, and if so, why. This was also an enlightening activity for my students; they all caught the sample that was blatant word-for-word, uncited plagiarism, but I had to explain that the sample which also quoted the original article word-for-word–but cited–was still plagiarizing. They don’t really understand what paraphrasing is or how to do it or that even re-working an author’s words into your own requires citation. I’m hoping to get one of the English instructors in at some point to help clarify this for them.

Overall, I’m quite pleased with how class went last night and think I’ll be sticking with this format–perhaps with some minor modifications–in the future!

May 27, 2011 at 1:47 pm 5 comments

notes on Collections Unbound: VLACRL Spring 2011 Program

I haven’t posted on here for a while because the semester wound down, I got a week off (yay!), and a new one has since commenced; it is now week 4 (out of 15) of the summer semester. I haven’t done much teaching so far as the first few weeks are spent doing housekeeping like going over the syllabus and creating an APA template (which, unbelievably, takes over an hour!). I did try a new plagiarism activity, though, that I got from one of those Library Instruction books I’ve mentioned. It involves giving each student a newspaper article that discusses how people in various professions (politics, fashion, music) have plagiarized and then gotten called on it, and then having them discuss the article with the class. This didn’t go over as well as I’d hoped–the activity is meant for a larger class; I only had 5 students last Friday, so each student got a different article. It’s also a lot of reading for first-semester students to handle in class; they aren’t quick readers. I’ll try something different when I teach my other section this Thursday.

I did attend a local workshop on patron-driven acquisition and e-book readers, though! I didn’t have much to take notes on since the information, while interesting, was much less applicable to my day job than I was expecting.

Collections Unbound

VLACRL Spring 2011 Program

May 9, 2011

Virginia Commonwealth University

Greg Raschke: “Clay Shirkey, Fantasy Football, and the Future of Library Collections”

• Economics are not sustainable
• Need to lower cost of overall cost
• Supply-side collections
• Print-based , unpredictable demand, and legitimate need for just-in-case
collections
• Demand-driven collections
• Not just PDA, but a portfolio of approaches
• Reducing unit cost – data analysis
• Scope your titles: put enough money in budget
• Time-honored role as custodians of scholarship vs. enabling digital environment for
scholars
• Fantasy football: Meets a need, it’s fun

Program slides/materials (scroll down to 2011 ACRL Spring Symposium, May 9, 2011)

May 23, 2011 at 3:43 pm 1 comment

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Megan Hodge

Megan Hodge

curiosity sherpa, #makingithappen

My passion is serving emerging adults (i.e., college students); this is the time of their life where they are figuring out who they are as people. I have worked with young adults most of my adult life, and I want to explore services and collections that will provide them with the skills they need to find information to improve their lives, both before and after graduation.

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