Designing and Delivering Technology Workshops: Tech Soup Webinar, 2/9/11

February 9, 2011 at 5:44 pm Leave a comment

I attended a Tech Soup webinar today on how to lead workshops on teaching technology. While I don’t have this role in either of the institutions where I work, I thought there would be a lot of useful information anyway (about reaching a certain age/computer-savviness demographic, which I work with as an adjunct instructor, and how to introduce computer-y things–which could include databases–to people entirely unfamiliar with them). Happily, I was right.

  • Remember each student is different
  • Organized flexibility: know what you’re going to talk about, but let the course of the class be determined by student wants/needs
  • Don’t underestimate the abilities of your students; let them try something and they just might succeed!
  • Remember how YOU like to learn: you like things to be self-directed and relevant to your job; you need time to practice and reflect
  • It takes vulnerability for adults to admit that they need to learn; create a safe, non-judgmental environment in which for them to learn
    • Have a “let’s play” workshop
  • Title: make it fun but make clear what training is about
  • Template: title, target audience, learning objectives, program description, timeline
  • Learning objectives
  • Include learning objectives in program description so potential attendees know what to expect
  • All activities and marketing should be based off of learning objectives
  • what outcomes would you like to see?
  • Use action verbs
  • Don’t get hung up on teaching skills; teaching what technologies can be used for is also useful
  • “Why might I use this?”
  • What happens after the session? One of the outcomes should include something that happens after workshop
  • Create an activity for each objective
    • Students may describe something better or more clearly than you could yourself
  • Learning activities
    • There are online tools that will create bingo cards for you
    • Pair share/learning partners
    • Book club
    • Polling
    • Action plans
    • Question sharing
    • Storytelling
    • Analogies
    • WebQuests
    • Snowball fight: everyone write down 1 question they still have on a ½ sheet of paper, then toss them around room. The person who catches the snowball has to research the answer to the question.
    • Scavenger hunt
    • Top 10 list
    • Chocolate hugs and kisses
    • Jeopardy
    • Speed sharing
    • Online games
    • Online spaces
    • Petting zoos
  • Create a learning community
    • Do introductions at beginning
    • Create a space online where the discussion can continue after the session has ended
  • Common Craft videos
  • E-mail handouts to people after session (put the choice of whether to print in their hands)
  • Mel Silverman’s Training the Active Training Way
    • Beginnings and endings are important, because that’s what we remember the most
    • Chunk material into small modules, so there are more of those beginnings and endings
  • Be the “guide on the side” rather than the “sage on the stage”
    • You won’t ever know it all; be the guide and then let them find the information they need on their own
  • http://bit.ly/tstwork to continue the discussion

· Remember each student is different

· Organized flexibility: know what you’re going to talk about, but let the course of the class be determined by student wants/needs

· Don’t underestimate the abilities of your students; let them try something and they just might succeed!

· Remember how YOU like to learn: you like things to be self-directed and relevant to your job; you need time to practice and reflect

· It takes vulnerability for adults to admit that they need to learn; create a safe, non-judgmental environment in which for them to learn

o Have a “let’s play” workshop

· Title: make it fun but make clear what training is about

· Include learning objectives in program description

· Template: title, target audience, learning objectives, program description, timeline

· Learning objectives

o All activities and marketing should be based off of learning objectives

o what outcomes would you like to see?

o Use action verbs

o Don’t get hung up on teaching skills; teaching what technologies can be used for is also useful

§ “Why might I use this?”

o What happens after the session? One of the outcomes should include something that happens after workshop

o Create an activity for each objective

§ Students may describe something better or more clearly than you could yourself

· Learning activities

o There are online tools that will create bingo cards for you

o Pair share/learning partners

o Book club

o Polling

o Action plans

o Question sharing

o Storytelling

o Analogies

o WebQuests

o Snowball fight: everyone write down 1 question they still have on a ½ sheet of paper, then toss them around room. The person who catches the snowball has to research the answer to the question.

o Scavenger hunt

o Top 10 list

o Chocolate hugs and kisses

o Jeopardy

o Speed sharing

o Online games

o Online spaces

o Petting zoos

· Create a learning community

o Do introductions at beginning

o Create a space online where the discussion can continue after the session has ended

· Common Craft videos

· E-mail handouts to people after session (put the choice of whether to print in their hands)

· Mel Silverman’s Training the Active Training Way

o Beginnings and endings are important, because that’s what we remember the most

o Chunk material into small modules, so there are more of those beginnings and endings

· Be the “guide on the side” rather than the “sage on the stage”

o You won’t ever know it all; be the guide and then let them find the information they need on their own

· http://bit.ly/tstwork to continue the discussion

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Entry filed under: Uncategorized.

How to be a good teacher I keep needing to remind myself to simplify, simplify, simplify.

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